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5 Questions to Ask When Managing the EA Side of Mergers and Acquisitions [Mind Map]

Published By Jeff Ellerbee
5 Questions to Ask When Managing the EA Side of Mergers and Acquisitions [Mind Map]

Just like two individuals coming together in a relationship, mergers and acquisitions (M&A) can be thought of similarly – an exciting proposal that is rife with potential landmines and arguments of what will stay and what will go. So managing EA in mergers & acquisitions can be difficult.

In theory, you want to create something greater than two separate companies or individuals and have them unite in harmony for the greater good. In both cases, the goal is a happy, healthy relationship with strong communication benefiting both parties.

But there are always countless details to work out –

  • Who has what?
  • What do we actually need?
  • What can we get rid of?

Whether you’re sorting out appliances and furniture or applications and technology redundancies, there are always major, unseen risks lurking under the surface. And the clock is always ticking.

With M&A activity, most stakeholders want to see significant progress in the first 60 to 90 days. The pressure is intense to understand what you have, how you can cut costs, and where you can improve efficiency.

I’ve talked to many customers who have experienced the same complexities with one conclusion: similar in a new living situation, you must prioritize by aligning your capabilities to company strategy.

Here are 5 Questions to Ask When Managing the enterprise architecture (EA) side of an M&A.

  • Impact Assessment: What are the impacts on the application and technology portfolios? What do we have and what are we still missing?
  • Business Content: What does the capability map of the new business look like?
  • Risk: What parts of the business have the highest risk?
  • Financials: Which products, services, applications, and technologies can be merged and what is the financial impact?
  • Change Scenarios: What is the progress of my M&A activities and which projects support them?

While no one may ever love your dated recliner, it’s possible to decrease costs, increase agility, and lower risk during a merger or acquisition. I invite you to download this complimentary Troux Mind Map that shows how EA technology can help you sort through the complexities of merger and acquisitions.

How are your currently managing the merger or acquisition at your company? Share your thoughts by leaving a comment below.

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Jeff Ellerbee Written by Jeff Ellerbee

Jeff Ellerbee, Solutions Consultant for Planview Enterprise One Capability and Technology Management. Jeff has helped customers be successful with CTM in the US and UK for 14 years. Jeff is a technical sales leader with more than 19 years of experience creating and selling software. He has designed, built, and successfully marketed five enterprise software products and a healthcare automation device for several venture-backed companies. Jeff is a software engineer turned sales engineer who has progressively shifted toward greater revenue generating responsibilities, taking on new challenges, creating more value for his customers and earning greater personal rewards.