Planview.com

Expand your knowledge

See our powerful enterprise architecture solution in action.

Watch Demo: enterprise architecture solution

Planview Blog

Your path to business agility


Enterprise Architecture

EA Planning: Developing a Common Framework and Language

Part 2: Monthly webcast helps capture what the business really wants

Published By Ashlee Motola
EA Planning: Developing a Common Framework and Language

When three groups with diverging interests and vocabularies come together for enterprise architecture planning, it is easy to miscommunicate when trying to prioritize expectations, issues and objectives.

I’m delighted to have the opportunity to work with IT expert Colin Scott on a monthly Ask the Expert webcast where attendees can submit their questions on a topic and hear his insights. In Part 1 of the webcast, Colin introduced the three major stakeholders for successful enterprise architecture planning. They are:

  • Business leaders
  • Enterprise architects
  • IT delivery leaders

No doubt, these groups will often speak a different language and bring competing expectations to the table when tackling strategy and planning, enterprise architecture, and program and project execution. I’m sure you’ve seen how this can even lead to significant mismatches that must be resolved during the in-flight planning cycle. Watch this webcast, Ask the Expert #1, now.

What’s the key to more effective communication? We’ve found it’s essential that your stakeholders build a common framework and vocabulary to help them answer these key questions:

  • Are we doing the right things?
  • Are we doing them the right way?
  • Are we getting them done well?
  • Are we getting the right results?

In Part 2 of the series, Colin tackled how to use a business capability model as a framework to understand what the business really wants and needs. This model can be leveraged for critical interaction among stakeholders during the planning process.

Colin commented that by focusing on the delivery or improvement of capabilities rather than the completion of projects capabilities can be assessed based on:

  • Strategic value
  • Technology fit
  • Business practice maturity
  • Technology platform maturity

What will you learn by using a business capability model? Colin shared from his experience common patterns will emerge that will help your enterprise develop a clearer picture of what capabilities should be enhanced as a matter of business priority.

To submit your questions to Colin for the next Ask the Expert webcast, “Ensuring What is Delivered Matches What Was Asked” taking place on Wednesday, June 1, please visit the Planview Ask the Expert site.

Related Posts

Ashlee Motola Written by Ashlee Motola

Ashlee is responsible for creating awareness and educating industry leaders on how they can make better decisions faster with Troux. She has worked with the Troux product for over 8 years, and is thrilled to now be part of the Planview family. Ashlee is Austin born and raised, and received her BA in Marketing from Abilene Christian University.