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Work Methods Are Proliferating: Ignore Them at Your Peril

Part 3 of 8 reasons your business strategy might just fail

Work Methods Are Proliferating: Ignore Them at Your Peril

Eight forces are exerting pressure on modern organizations. In this third installment of our series, I cover the increasing number of work methods that employees at all levels are using in today’s businesses. To succeed, leaders must incorporate these into a modern approach to PPM with Work and Resource Management.

  1. Outcomes are different
  2. Capabilities must be strategic
  3. WORK METHODS ARE PROLIFERATING
  4. Unstructured work is exploding
  5. Plans are even more critical
  6. Teams are virtual and global
  7. Technology is everywhere
  8. Resources are multiplying

Here’s a quick video of me introducing this concept during our recent customer conference in Austin:

 

Work Methods Are Proliferating

Think of the complexity of the modern organization. Achieving a company’s strategic objectives requires specialists in every area of the business. Those specialists are increasingly relying on a wide variety of work methodologies and technology applications to help them get their jobs done. These methodologies include everything from traditional project management to Lean to Agile to phase-gate – with more coming everyday.

Work and Resource Management

The flexibility of this environment is a big plus but it comes with it’s own set of challenges, including getting everyone on the same page. Leaders must ensure that everyone is connected to the broader strategy and how they contribute to it. In turn, to deliver the best possible products and services to the customer, these leaders must grasp how all the work being done via these methods contributes to the whole. It’s time to incorporate all the work types in organizations into a portfolio-level view of the world.

Traditionally, PPM has focused solely on projects, which represent only one part of the way work is done in any enterprise. PPM software has had great success and remains critical to helping organizations manage their limited resources for their high profile, structured projects. Yet PPM is not enough in a world of growing work methods and unstructured, collaborative projects and tasks, which make up the largest part of any organization’s work portfolio (I will cover this in my next blog post).

This is where Work and Resource Management comes in as a way to tackle this broader set of work and resource challenges. Under this larger category, we have expanded upon our PPM roots with a comprehensive set of solutions that uniquely address, among other things, the variety of ways teams and organizations work. With a truly integrated work and resource portfolio, customers gain a higher-impact view of resources across the enterprise to better achieve their objectives.

In the world of Work and Resource Management, we are continuing to embrace our PPM roots, but expanding dramatically the frameworks for how work is done. In the WRM world we envision a holistic way to help organizations to connect strategy and execution – across all types of work and all kinds of resources. As we wrote in our whitepaper (“8 Reasons Your Business Strategy Might Just Fail”): “Without a way to harness all these work and resource elements strategically in support of an organization’s goals, the result will be inefficiency, stagnation, and even chaos.”

In my next post, I’ll cover disruptive force #4: “Unstructured work is exploding.”

For more information on all the forces impacting Work and Resource Management – including videos, whitepapers, and analyst research – visit www.Planview.com/wrm.Work and Resource Management

I’d like to hear from you. How does your organization typically plan and execute on products, services, and applications? Share by leaving a comment below.

 

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Patrick Tickle
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Patrick Tickle is responsible for the company’s Products organization and leads the Planview team that continues to deliver the most innovative portfolio management solutions to the marketplace. Patrick brings over 20 years of experience in product management, product development, and marketing across a wide range of technology solutions. Prior to joining Planview, Patrick served as Vice President of Marketing and Product Management of ITM Software where he executed category development and product definition. He has also held a variety of product management and marketing positions at Terraspring, Inc. (an enterprise software company acquired by Sun Microsystems), MIPS, and Silicon Graphics. He has a BS in Electrical Engineering from the University of Notre Dame and an MBA from the University of North Carolina. @ptickle (Patrick Tickle on Twitter)
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